Press Review

15.06.2015 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
New electron accelerator at JGU reaches first milestone
As the production of two superconducting accelerator modules for the future electron accelerator MESA ("Mainz Energy-Recovering Superconducting Accelerator") at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) gets on its way, the MESA project launches into its next phase. MESA is based on a unique concept for recovering a part of the energy that is required for accelerating the electron beam. 
15.06.2015 - Research in Germany
New electron accelerator at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz reaches first milestone
Official project start for the production of superconducting accelerator modules 
15.06.2015 - innovations report – Forum for Science, Industry and Business
New electron accelerator at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz reaches first milestone
Official project start for the production of superconducting accelerator modules 
05.06.2015 - Research in Germany
Mainz physicists provide important component for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN
After a two-year operational pause and two months after its restart in April 2015, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN research center is now again recording data at energies as high as never before. These high-energy collisions at the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator are the beginning of a new era of particle physics and scientists hope that they will provide new insights into the structure of matter and possibly even a fundamental revision of the concepts of physics. Some 50 researchers from Mainz University will be actively participating in the research at the LHC in the coming years. 
04.06.2015 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Mainz physicists provide important component for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN
After a two-year operational pause and two months after its restart in April 2015, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN research center is now again recording data at energies as high as never before. These high-energy collisions at the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator are the beginning of a new era of particle physics and scientists hope that they will provide new insights into the structure of matter and possibly even a fundamental revision of the concepts of physics. Some 50 researchers from Mainz University will be actively participating in the research at the LHC in the coming years. 
08.05.2015 - Reserach in Germany
German Council of Science and Humanities endorses construction of Center of Fundamental Physics research building at Mainz University
Investment volume of about EUR 61 million / Renewed recognition of the quality of research into particle and hadron physics being undertaken at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. 
07.05.2015 - AZO Quantum
Construction of JGU’s Center of Fundamental Physics Receives Support from the German Council of Science and Humanities
The German Council of Science and Humanities has agreed to support an application by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) for federal and state funding for a new research building for particle, astro-particle, and hadron physics. The Funding for University Buildings program is designed to exclusively provide financing for the construction of buildings housing research projects of multi-regional significance and characterized by innovative and interdisciplinary research concepts. 
12.02.2015 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
New research program at the interface of solid state physics and quantum physics
A research project looking at quantum phenomena that involves the physicists Professor Ron Folman of Ben Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, Israel, and Professor Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Germany, as well as their respective teams has been granted EUR 1.6 million in support through the German-Israeli Project Cooperation (DIP) program. 
03.02.2015 - Labmate Online [UK]
Physicists from Mainz University Participate in JUNO
The construction of the facilities for the JUNO neutrino experiment has been initiated with an official groundbreaking ceremony near the south Chinese city of Jiangmen, attended by representatives from more than fifty partnering institutions from China, the US and Europe. Starting in 2020, the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) will begin to produce new information about the particle characteristics of the neutrino. "The aim of JUNO is to precisely measure the oscillations of neutrinos for the purpose of investigating one of the major issues in neutrino physics today – the sequence or hierarchy of neutrino masses," explained Professor Michael Wurm of the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), one of the assigned German JUNO partners who watched the start of work on the underground lab. 
28.01.2015 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Particle physicists discuss JUNO neutrino experiment
The construction of the facilities for the JUNO neutrino experiment has been initiated with an official groundbreaking ceremony near the south Chinese city of Jiangmen. Involved in the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) will be more than fifty institutions from China, the US and Europe – with six from Germany alone. Starting in 2020, JUNO will begin to produce new information about the particle characteristics of the neutrino.
09.01.2015 - Deccan Chronicle [India]
Historic Rosetta mission named 2014 'Physics world breakthrough of year'
The first historic Rosetta mission has been named 2014 "breakthrough of the year" by the journal Physics World, it has been reported.
Listed among its ten most important 2014 breakthroughs of the year were also the recent discoveries of the Borexino experiment, in which a team of physicists from Mainz University led by Professor Michael Wurm are participating.
08.01.2015 - Business Standard [India]
Historic Rosetta mission named 2014 'Physics world breakthrough of year'
The first historic Rosetta mission has been named 2014 "breakthrough of the year" by the journal Physics World, it has been reported.
Listed among its ten most important 2014 breakthroughs of the year were also the recent discoveries of the Borexino experiment, in which a team of physicists from Mainz University led by Professor Michael Wurm are participating.
08.01.2015 - ZeeNews [India]
Historic Rosetta mission named 2014 'Physics world breakthrough of year'
The Physics World editorial team decided to single out the historic achievement of the scientists working on the Rosetta mission for its significance and fundamental importance to space science.
Listed among its ten most important 2014 breakthroughs of the year were also the recent discoveries of the Borexino experiment, in which a team of physicists from Mainz University led by Professor Michael Wurm are participating.
07.01.2015 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
Rosetta Mission Named Physics World 2014 Breakthrough of the Year
The journal Physics World has named the first landing of a research probe on a comet as its 2014 Breakthrough of the Year. The Physics World editorial team decided to single out the historic achievement of the scientists working on the Rosetta mission for its significance and fundamental importance to space science.
Listed among its ten most important 2014 breakthroughs of the year were also the recent discoveries of the Borexino experiment, in which a team of physicists from Mainz University led by Professor Michael Wurm are participating.
07.01.2015 - innovations report – Forum for Science, Industry and Business
Rosetta mission named Physics World 2014 Breakthrough of the Year
Mainz scientists participating in both the Rosetta mission and the Borexino experiment 
19.12.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Joachim Kopp receives ERC Starting Grant for research in particle and astroparticle physics
Professor Joachim Kopp receives a prestigious Starting Grant worth EUR 800,000 from the European Research Council (ERC) to help promote his work in the field of theoretical particle and astroparticle physics. Working at the Cluster of Excellence "Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter" (PRISMA) of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany, Kopp's special interests are neutrinos and dark matter. He will be using the ERC Starting Grant to pursue new approaches in theoretical neutrino physics. 
22.09.2014 - Research in Germany
International team of researchers have for the first time established a chemical bond between a superheavy element and a carbon atom
New vistas for studying effects of Einstein's relativity on the structure of the periodic table 
19.09.2014 - New Scientist
Einstein makes an appearance in superheavy chemistry
When chemistry goes superheavy, things start to get weird. Researchers have created the first chemical compound that requires Einstein's theory of relativity to explain its behaviour, thanks to the presence of a superheavy element. 
19.09.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Milestone in chemical studies of superheavy elements: Superheavy element and carbon atom bonded for first time
A chemical bond between a superheavy element and a carbon atom has been established for the first time. This research opens new vistas for studying the effects of Einstein's relativity on the structure of the periodic table. 
19.09.2014 - R&D Magazine [USA]
First-ever chemical bond established between carbon and a superheavy element
An international collaboration led by research groups from Mainz and Darmstadt has achieved the synthesis of a new class of chemical compounds for superheavy elements at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Research (RNC) in Japan. For the first time, a chemical bond was established between a superheavy element – seaborgium (element 106) in the present study – and a carbon atom. 
19.09.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Researchers present a milestone in chemical studies of superheavy elements
An international collaboration led by research groups from Mainz and Darmstadt, Germany, has achieved the synthesis of a new class of chemical compounds for superheavy elements at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Research (RNC) in Japan. For the first time, a chemical bond was established between a superheavy element – seaborgium (element 106) in the present study – and a carbon atom. 
02.09.2014 - Research in Germany
Detection of pp-neutrinos provides first direct measurement of solar power at its production
Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz contribute to experimental effort 
29.08.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
On the search for "new phyics"
The venue for the 2014 Summer Graduate School "Symmetries and Fundamental Interactions" will be the Frauenwörth Abbey near the Bavarian Alps. The participants will be focusing on subjects such as the physics of the Higgs particle, the search for "New Physics," and the corresponding unifying theory that will greatly expand our understanding of elementary particles and fundamental forces. 
09.06.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
One of the biggest riddles in physics is the apparent imbalance between matter and antimatter in our universe. To date, there is no explanation as to why matter and antimatter failed to completely annihilate one another immediately after the big bang and how the surplus matter was created that went on to form the universe as we know it. Experiments conducted at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have contributed towards a resolution of this problem. 
06.06.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton / Results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry 
06.06.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton.  The results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry. 
06.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton / Results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry 
30.05.2014 - The Huffington Post [USA]
Proton's Magnetism Measured With Greatest Precision Yet
In an attempt to solve the mystery of the Universe’s missing antimatter, physicists have achieved the most precise measurement yet of the proton's inherent magnetism. 
03.05.2014 - The Huffington Post [USA]
New Super-Heavy Element 117 'Ununseptium' Confirmed By Scientists
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. 
03.05.2014 - Business Standard [India]
New element with atomic number 117 set to become reality
Researchers at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darm-stadt, Germany, have obtained evidence for the artificial creation of element 117.The experiment was performed by an international team 72 scientists and engineers from 16 institutions in Australia, Finland, Germany, India, Japan, Norway, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, headed by Prof. Christoph Dullmann, who holds positions at GSI, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). 
02.05.2014 - Discovery News [USA]
New Super-Heavy Element 117 Confirmed
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. 
02.05.2014 - NBCNEWS.com [USA]
New Element 117 Vies for a Seat at the (Periodic) Table
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. 
02.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Superheavy element 117 confirmed
The stage is set for a new, super-heavy element to be added to the periodic table following research published in the latest Physical Review Letters. Led by researchers at Germany's GSI laboratory, the team created atoms of element 117, matching the heaviest atoms ever observed, which are 40 per cent heavier than an atom of lead. [...] The experiment was performed by an international team of chemists and physicists headed by Prof. Christoph Düllmann, who holds positions at GSI, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Electron on the scale
Electrons are the quantum glue of our world. Without electrons there would be no chemistry, and light would be unable to interact with matter. If electrons were only a little heavier or lighter than they are, the world would look radically different. But how can a particle which is so tiny that it has so far been considered point-like actually be weighed? 
04.02.2014 - International Science Times / iScienceTimes [USA]
One-Atom Engine World's Smallest: Could It Be More Efficient Than One Running On Four Cylinders?
A theoretical physicist in Germany has envisioned a one-atom engine he claims would be more powerful than the combustion engine. In his paper in Physical Review Letters, Johannes Rossnagel claims that such an engine would be at least two times as efficient as a conventional engine operating according to the laws of thermodynamics. Rossnagel, from the Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, describes a hypothetical engine consisting of a calcium ion forced to oscillate between two laser fields, one heating it, the other cooling it. 
03.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Researchers build nanoscale single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. 
03.02.2014 - R&D Magazine [USA]
Physicists build pilot prototype of a single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz (JGU), Germany, and the Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. 
03.02.2014 - Popular Mechanics [USA]
The World's Smallest Engine Runs on a Single Atom
Physicists are building a nano engine that runs on a single atom and will arguably be the most efficient ever made. 
03.02.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters 
03.02.2014 - Research in Germany
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters 
22.11.2013 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
IceCube Provides Proof of Neutrinos from the Cosmos – Start of the Neutrino Astronomy Era
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole was the first to discover ultrahigh-energy neutrinos which most likely were the result of cosmic acceleration in outer space. "After more than a decade of intense searching, we can now announce that we have found neutrinos that were very probably generated in the vast expanses of outer space", reported Professor Lutz Köpke of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). 
03.09.2013 - ECN Magazine [USA]
New superheavy elements can be uniquely identified
International research collaboration at GSI including researchers of Mainz University uses element 115 to highlight a way for taking new superheavy elements' fingerprints 
30.08.2013 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Physicists use element 115 to highlight a way for taking new superheavy elements' fingerprints
An international team of researchers presents fresh evidence that confirms the existence of the superheavy chemical element 115. The experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darmstadt. Under the lead of physicists from Lund University in Sweden, the group, which included researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), was able to present a way to directly identify new superheavy elements. 
30.08.2013 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
New Superheavy Elements Can Be Uniquely Identified
An international team of researchers presents fresh evidence that confirms the existence of the superheavy chemical element 115. The experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darmstadt. Under the lead of physicists from Lund University in Sweden, the group, which included researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), was able to present a way to directly identify new superheavy elements. 
30.08.2013 - Opli [Israel]
New superheavy elements can be uniquely identified
International research collaboration at GSI including researchers of Mainz University uses element 115 to highlight a way for taking new superheavy elements' fingerprints 
12.08.2013 - R&D Magazine [USA]
Phase transition findings offer clues to matter structures moments after Big Bang
Research groups at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Physical-Technical Federal Institute (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Ulm and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have been investigating the formation of defects occurring when a Coulomb crystal of ions is driven through a second-order phase transition. For this purpose, they compressed one-dimensional linear chains of ions at high speeds to form a two-dimensional zigzag structure with a form similar to that of an accordion. This process can lead to the generation of defects in the resultant crystal structure. 
12.08.2013 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Physicists of Mainz University investigate the formation of defects during phase transitions in crystals of ions
Research groups at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Physical-Technical Federal Institute (PTB) in Braunschweig, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Ulm and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have been investigating the formation of defects occurring when a Coulomb crystal of ions is driven through a second-order phase transition. For this purpose, they compressed one-dimensional linear chains of ions at high speeds to form a two-dimensional zigzag structure with a form similar to that of an accordion. This process can lead to the generation of defects in the resultant crystal structure. 
16.07.2013 - Research in Germany
500 physicists to attend Lattice Symposium in Mainz
Mainz Institute of Nuclear Physics will show scientists from throughout the world the research potential of HIM and PRISMA 
09.11.2012 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
On the hunt for dark matter
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany inaugurated its "Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter" (PRISMA) Cluster of Excellence. About 250 scientists have now officially begun their work in the new research association, which was approved in the most recent phase of the German Excellence Initiative by the German federal and state governments. Over the next five years, the cluster will be funded with about EUR 35 million from the German government, the state of Rhineland-Palatinate, and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz for top-level research into particle and hadron physics. Mainz has thus established itself as the center for particle and hadron physics in Germany and the world. 
20.07.2012 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
XENON100 sets record limits for dark matter
Scientists from the XENON collaboration announced a new result from their search for dark matter. The analysis of data taken with the XENON100 detector during 13 months of operation at the Gran Sasso Laboratory (Italy) provided no evidence for the existence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), the leading dark matter candidates. Two events being observed are statistically consistent with one expected event from background radiation. Compared to their previous 2011 result the world-leading sensitivity has again been improved by a factor of 3.5. This constrains models of new physics with WIMP candidates even further and it helps to target future WIMP searches. A paper with the results is going to be submitted to Physical Review Letters and on the arXiv. 
New Collaborative Research Center 1044: The low-energy frontier of the standard model
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved funding for the establishment of a new Collaborative Research Center (CRC) at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Beginning in January 2012, CRC 1044 "The Low-Energy Frontier of the Standard Model: From Quarks and Gluons to Hadrons and Nuclei" will tackle fundamental questions within the world of subatomic particles. 
10.01.2012 - www.chemeurope.com
First hint of the Higgs boson particle
Particle physicists at Mainz University are excited: 50 years after its prediction, the Higgs boson gradually takes shape 
06.01.2012 - Science Daily [USA]
First Hint of the Higgs Boson Particle
The answer to one of the most exciting questions in particle physics seems almost close enough to touch: Scientists at the Geneva research center CERN have observed first signs of the Higgs boson and now believe that they will soon be able to prove the existence of the elementary particle they have been trying so hard to isolate. It is the last missing piece in the puzzle of the Standard Model of particle physics to explain the structure of matter. A discovery would be sensational news.